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Monday, March 19, 2012

What the Mailman Knows about Ayers and Obama

This is another one of those stories that makes you say hmm. I have no way to know if this is true or if it is a myth. - Reggie


American Thinker
A few days ago I got a call asking whether I knew anything about the Ayers family mailman. I had heard of him, I said. I remembered liberal blogger Steven Diamond having interviewed the fellow a few years back, but I paid it little mind, as the information seemed too limited to pursue.

The caller then sent me a video interview with the mailman by WND sleuth Jerome Corsi. The video made me sit up and pay attention. The mailman is a real person. His name is Alan Hulton. He seems entirely credible, and he has a story to tell.

Hulton delivered mail in Glen Ellyn, Illinois, from 1962 to 2001 with a couple years off to serve in the military. During roughly ten of those years, he delivered mail to the home of Tom and Mary Ayers, Bill Ayers's parents. Hulton talked to Tom once, Mary several times, their daughter-in-law Bernardine Dohrn a few times, and Bill Ayers not at all. Memorably, he talked once to one of their visitors, but more on that in a moment.

As Hulton tells Corsi -- and he has sworn an affidavit to the same -- he met Tom Ayers not long after the Ayerses moved to the neighborhood. Until he retired in 1980 at the age of 65, Tom Ayers was the CEO and chairman of Commonwealth Edison. Tom, however, was not your garden-variety plutocrat. According to Diamond, who knows his way around Chicago politics, Tom was a "lifelong liberal" -- one deeply involved in the same educational reform movement that engaged son Bill and, briefly, Barack Obama in 1988. Tom Ayers was comfortable enough with Bill's lifestyle to live with him in Hyde Park until Tom died in 2007.

When Hulton met Tom Ayers, they talked about working conditions at the Post Office. "I couldn't believe how he responded," Hulton told Diamond. "He started to talk about workers having to struggle to survive and about peasants and the proletariat. It made me think later that he might be a Marxist!" Hulton would tell Corsi, "I had this uncomfortable feeling that he thought he knew about my situation as a working person better than I did, that he knew what was best for me."

Hulton also recalls one particular conversation with Mary Ayers. "She was enthusiastically talking to me about this young black student that they were helping out," he tells Corsi, "and she referred to him as a foreign student." Adds Hulton, "I was taken aback by how enthusiastic she was about him." Within a year of this conversation, Hulton had a fateful meeting with the young man he presumed Mary was talking about.

According to Hulton, he encountered the fellow on the sidewalk on the front of the Ayers home. In that it was extremely rare to see a black man in this tony neighborhood, Hulton believes that the man felt the need to explain his visit to the Ayers household. Hulton describes him as friendly and neatly, although casually, dressed. Hulton tells Corsi, "I am absolutely positive that it was Barack Obama."

Hulton was sympathetic. After he had come out of military service, he was a supporter of Martin Luther King, who had pressed for fair housing in the Chicago area in the 1960s. "I took some flak about my support for civil rights from my fellow workers at the time," remembers Hulton.

Obama explained to Hulton that he had taken the train out from Chicago to Glen Ellyn in order "to thank the Ayers family personally for helping him with his education." What shocked Hulton was that when casually inquiring into the young man's plans for the future, Obama answered, "I am going to be president of the United States." As Hulton tells Corsi, "[i]t came across like this was something that's already been determined." Adds Hulton, "I was speechless."

Hulton told Diamond and Corsi essentially the same story. What gives the Corsi interview added value is that we see Hulton tell it. Although just a year older than Bill Ayers, he seems to come from a different generation. He has little to gain -- and a lot to risk -- by going public. Corsi warns Hulton that by quoting Mary's comment that Obama was a "foreign student," he has put himself at some risk. Says Hulton, "I am only telling you what I distinctly remember her saying -- that he was a foreign student."

Read the full article

UPDATE: Below are excerpts of Jerome Corsi’s interviews with Allen Hulton:


The story associated with the video is linked below:

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